Sunday, 11 January 2015

My latest short story: The bridge over Disang Noi


I begin 2015 with this short story published by Writers Asylum.

Excerpt:

"I was on the other side of the grey bridge made of cement, the sand and dust and pebbles adding a grainy quality to it. And from my side of the bridge, I saw how the road sloped downwards with a line of areca nut trees: Crops of green leaves rendered golden here and there, by a touch of the sunrays, sitting atop lanky columns. Up ahead, young banana plants sprouted out of the brown-green land, looking like dwarves against the areca nut trees. And a few paces beyond was just the brown-green land that dropped and fell into the river, Disang Noi. The water reflected the green of the trees, the grey of the bridge, the blue of the sky and the white of the clouds that formed the swirls of a brush on a canvas. On the other side of the river, the land rose again, grey in tone, slanting in posture, before turning into an expanse of greenery that stretched and disappeared into a wall of trees. All I could see from where I stood was the green of trees and the land; and the green rising up to the white clouds in a blue sky that was beginning to splash red and purple.

At the other end of the bridge, quite into the distance, a red dot blinked. It revealed the contours of a WagonR as it shot out of the greenery. I knew it was a WagonR because somebody from our village who long ago shifted to Sibsagar town had recently purchased one and when he made his annual trip to check on his property in the village, he had to give all of his time to the villagers who wanted to check out his car from inside and out. The red car almost flew on to the bridge and came to a screeching halt in the middle. There it stood, just like that, in the middle of the bridge, for what seemed like eternity. And then, a very attractive man got down. He bore the confidence of a city man."

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